kip_w: (miner)
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New entry at <a href="http://kipwblog.blogspot.com/2015/12/yes-its-art.html">the New Pals Club Web-Log</a> concerning the final two figure drawings from my class this semester past. To recap: first real drawing instruction I can recall, at the college level. Naked people. And I shook the hand that shook the hand of Ed Gein.
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kip_w: (Default)
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Many of you know I'm a big fan of the late Jess Collins (aka Jess), whose meticulous cut-and-paste jobs on Chester Gould's "Dick Tracy" comic strip resulted in some seriously crazed images. Jess was a pop-art pioneer who doesn't get enough credit. There should be a book of his Tricky Cad masterpieces (a gallery owner told me that the fragile newsprint originals won't last forever, and at least one is no longer viewable!). Until there is, there's my flickr page, where I've collected every example I could find of these masterpieces.

TRICKY CAD IV-B

And here we have a sort-of new one. I have a shot of one of the notebooks (this one resides in the Odyssia Gallery in NYC, and I hope one day I'll get to see it directly), and the second page is at an angle and not easy to see. Well, now it's easier to see.
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step one

Oct. 8th, 2011 10:15 am
kip_w: (Default)
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When I was taking Commercial Art, I watched a filmstrip on how to make color separations. "Sometimes, a customer will provide you with color separations that they have made," said the narrator. "Discard these. Now, open the..."
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kip_w: (hands)
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A blast from the past. In an article I wrote for Plokta, I included (along with many others) the very rare and collectible "Atlas Shrugged" View-Master reel (which Ayn Rand herself reportedly enjoyed):

1. “I built a railroad by myself.”
2. “Give us your new metal, Rearden!”
3. Grabby second-raters take everything in sight.
4. Where have all the smart guys gone?
5. “Hank! Come with us to a new life.”
6. Eddie can’t make the engine work.
7. “It’s like heaven—with cigarettes!”

I just saved you all $7.25, not to mention what you'd have spent on popcorn and going to see parts 2 and 3 — where you would, presumably, also eat popcorn! So send money, or you're all just parasites and second-raters. You know it's the right thing to do.

(note: You might also enjoy Ellis Weiner's sequel to "Atlas Slugged," over at Smashwords. The fellow — a veteran of the funny days of National Lampoon, I believe — has a good grasp on the way paragons of society talk to one another:)
In a single silent act he shifted his gaze from them to Dragnie until their eyeballs silently beheld one another’s. “You who claim to serve no one,” he said. “You for whom the very idea of granting a favor is a metaphysical chimera, an imaginary creature possessing no reality; you whose sole allegiance is, not to some comforting but fictional construct called ‘society’ but, simply and utterly, to existence; you for whom life itself is rational and self-interested or it is nothing; you who, without shame or boasting, call ‘self-reliance’ what the mass of men call ‘selfishness;’ you who ask nothing of any man for which you will not, at once and without cavil, give some other thing of equal value; you, who know in the deepest recesses of your consciousness that to perform the slightest kindness to others, without the promise of reciprocity in a manner that is meaningful to you on your own terms, is to collude in the enslavement of both them and yourself; you, who ask nothing of the world apart from its consent to leave you to freely pursue your desires in a manner consistent with your own values and morality—will you, not so much in violation of these principles as from an unthreatened position of strength afforded by them, pass the brisket?”
(excerpt from the first fifth of the book, which is posted at the link as an enticement to purchase, and because 20% of information wants to be free)

edited to add the word "View-Master"
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kip_w: (hands)
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Robert Crumb, one of the greatest comic artists, will be on WFMU to talk about his passion for old music today (part 1 of 2). The station will make it available as video too. Here's what they said on their blog:
Underground artist/hero and avid 78 RPM collector Robert Crumb joins Mac on the Antique Phonograph Music Program. He will talk about why no music recorded after the 1930s matters, and provide other nuggets of wisdom gleaned from 50+ years spent collecting records. Links will be provided to video of Crumb's interview! It happens on 4/5 from 8 to 9 PM (part 1 of 2).
I looked at the program link, and if you have any interest in old records, you might get lost in their archives. Looks like there are a lot of shows there that can be clicked upon.

tip time

Sep. 1st, 2010 11:47 pm
kip_w: (1971)
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I said something halfway intelligent and useful the other day and thought I might repeat it here in case it could be useful to someone else. My sister remarked that she had big difficulties in drawing with a Wacom tablet.

So I said that one thing that helps me is resizing as I draw. There's a certain gestural size where I can most naturally craft a straight line, or a circle, or a letter, and I adjust the size of the picture to take maximum advantage of that.

Of course, another thing that helps a lot is being able to isolate (by putting a new addition to the drawing onto a different layer and only merging when it's where I want) and to go back and do things over.

Hope this helps somebody.
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kip_w: (Default)
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Page 55 of the book Thrift Store Paintings shows two pulp-like paintings involving large robots. A robot bursts out of a packing box. A robot menaces two young women. They were interesting, but it was only when Cathy persuaded me to go see an art exhibition at Old Dominion University that I really appreciated the artist, Danny Hall.

The gallery, which occupied a former storefront on Granby Street in Norfolk, VA, consisted of just about all the paintings in the book, and more. I was pleased to see more canvases by Roehl, whose off-kilter images might have influenced me afterwards. The real revelation was seeing two more works by Hall in the same series, with the same robots. One showed military officials watching a launch of a flying robot. The other showed white-coated scientists performing maintenance work on one or two of the giant humanoids while an officer looks out unemotionally over a balcony at a room the size of an aircraft hangar that is packed with standing robots. Even as the details of the work get fuzzy in my mind (which I sometimes suspect doesn't deal with pictures so much as it deals with verbal descriptions of pictures that it then uses to try to reconstruct the originals later), the sense of space stays with me, and the feeling that this massive chamber full of these gigantic mechanical marvels was somehow mundane to their uniformed masters.

Today, it occurred to me to search online for the artist, and I may have found him. Charles Danny Hall, born 1910, was a designer working in Hollywood. He worked for Chaplin and many others. He did watercolors for many years. In one painting, the signature resembles that on the two paintings in the book I have, as far as I'm able to tell. Then again, another painting (from Ebay), offers a magnified view of a somewhat different looking signature.

So I don't know if I've solved a mystery or just made it worse. If I'd only had a digital camera back in those days, I'd have taken pictures of quite a few of those paintings.
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kip_w: (tree)
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But you can turn an x-ray eye on favorite cartoon characters and see what lurks below the fur and feathers. This is not smut (awwww), but the result of some concentrated thinking on things that were never made to hold concentrated thought. I'm personally glad that people have enough time to do things like this. I wish... I wish... but never mind. It'd be nice to be in Stumpville, Oregon this month, though, because these are on exhibit there.

"O swell new world, to have such nifty stuff." --Shakes
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kip_w: (tree)
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I was looking at one of the books we picked up in Italy. It's the exhibition catalog for a show at the Uffizi Gallery in Florence on the origin of perspective. The show, which I literally had to run through when I discovered it after my time had already run out, included illusion boxes and fake perspective inlays and all that wonderful stuff. While I looked at it, I was thinking about an artist whose work we had seen in Venice. He carved some terrific wooden panels at the Scuolo di San Rocco. His name had gone out of my head, so I went back to the book at hand and picked a line at random to see if I could make head and/or tails of it, and halfway through the sentence, I ran into the word "pianta."

Hey, that was the name of the artist in Venice! Roberto Pianta. Thank you, Serendipity!
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